The chart above illustrates the average auto insurance premiums across Canada. Typically the province of Ontario is characterized by the highest auto insurance rates. Quebec, as a rule, has more affordable car insurance premiums since the health part of the insurance (e.g. bodily injuries) is covered by the government. Not all provinces allow customers to choose from a variety of insurers. Three provinces have crown companies being the only source of vehicle insurance:
Yes! The auto insurance quotes you get at Kanetix.ca come straight from the insurance companies and are the same rates you would get if you called them directly; there is no better price to be had. But remember, the rates are only as accurate as the details you provide, so if any information changes once you're chatting with the insurance provider, your rate may change too. 
Among the things insurance companies don’t take into account are: employment history, bankruptcy, your housing situation and history, or your net worth. In Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador, insurers also cannot take your credit score into account when assessing your premiums – but in Nova Scotia they can; in Alberta, they need your permission. Car colour also doesn’t affect rates – it is a widely-believed myth that owners of red cars pay more – they don’t.
Although rural backroads and small-towns in Ontario do have their own unique hazards, owning and driving a car in an urban area, like Toronto or Ottawa, carries significantly higher risks for everything from traffic accidents to theft to minor fender benders. Due to the higher risk associated with cars in the city, car insurance is generally more expensive in city centres.
Pay-as-you-drive: Some insurance providers can reduce your insurance premiums based on your driving profile (capturing data via a special device added to your vehicle). Insurance companies like Desjardins Insurance or Industrial Alliance attract customers promising cheaper vehicle insurance premiums if you can demonstrate that you are a safe driver.
Although rural backroads and small-towns in Ontario do have their own unique hazards, owning and driving a car in an urban area, like Toronto or Ottawa, carries significantly higher risks for everything from traffic accidents to theft to minor fender benders. Due to the higher risk associated with cars in the city, car insurance is generally more expensive in city centres.

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What the above facts help illustrate is that, quite simply, Toronto is a big, busy city with lots of cars on the road. This translates to lots of driving and lots of traffic congestion, which can lead to accidents - especially multi-vehicle accidents. Factor in pedestrians, cyclists, and public transportation (TTC), and there is no shortage of things that drivers need to pay attention to when behind the wheel.
Preferred Vendor Program: Preferred Vendors offer the highest-quality workmanship. When you choose a Preferred Vendor for your repairs, the quality of workmanship is monitored and the bill is settled directly with the repair shop, giving you a hassle-free claims experience. Plus, collision repairs made by a Preferred Vendor are guaranteed for life.1
It might take a bit of time and work, but in the end you can save yourself a lot of money. Remember that there are so many factors that affect how much you pay, and so much that constantly changes, that you can do this again every so often and again find a better deal if you’re willing to put in the work. Changing companies does not negatively affect your rates.
While Toronto politicians have made efforts to encourage the use of transit and bike lanes, the truth is that more and more residents are choosing to drive. If you are one of them, it is crucial that you have a quality car insurance policy that will cover you when the unexpected occurs. By following these guidelines, you can get the best coverage for your money.
Mortgage Savings: Based on the present value of monthly savings over the mortgage term (3-years). The monthly savings is the difference in monthly payments between the lowest and third lowest mortgage rates from major Canadian lenders as of April 24, 2012. These rates are for a 3-Year closed mortgage for $350,000, with an amortization period of 25 years, in the province of Ontario, for a borrower with a good credit rating.
But a new type of insurance policy has arrived in Canada that may be just the ticket to help out the high risk driver. Usage based insurance (UBI) has been adopted by several insurance companies in Ontario that are now placing data collection boxes–run by telematics technology–in the cars of their customers to track and record how they drive, including monitoring such things as quick turns, hard acceleration, braking and overall speed. Several Ontario auto insurance firms now present customers with a five to 10 percent discount to do a trial run. In the course of trying to establish a better driving record, having such objective data in the hands of auto insurance providers is bound to help the high risk driver who conforms to safe driving habits.

What you use your vehicle for and how often you’re behind the wheel can be a contributing factor in setting car insurance premiums. To get the best rates possible, always try to be as specific as you can about your driving habits. You might consider installing a Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) unit on your car, which tracks where and how you drive, to provide proof of your driving habits. These devices often reward good driving behavior (and penalize bad driving habits such as speeding).
Mortgage Savings: Based on the present value of monthly savings over the mortgage term (3-years). The monthly savings is the difference in monthly payments between the lowest and third lowest mortgage rates from major Canadian lenders as of April 24, 2012. These rates are for a 3-Year closed mortgage for $350,000, with an amortization period of 25 years, in the province of Ontario, for a borrower with a good credit rating.
However, there are some other federal and provincial laws that allow for exceptions. The biggest exception is Bill S-4, or the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. One of the implications for insurance companies is that it they can share personal information without consent if it reasonably allows them to discover and prevent fraud.
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