A car insurance deductible, in essence, is a predetermined amount of money required to be paid by the policyholder when a claim is filed. In Ontario, deductibles can vary, with standard base amounts at about $500 for collision coverage and $300 for comprehensive coverage. A higher deductible can mean lower car insurance premiums but means more money comes out of your pocket during a claim.

Raising the deductible limits on collision and comprehensive coverage lowers monthly insurance premiums. By taking on more financial responsibility in the case of an accident, a driver lowers day to day costs. A driver must be ready, however, to absorb these costs if an accident occurs. Note that in some cases where a driver is not at fault, other insurance provisions or companies may cover some or all deductible amounts. Check with your agent or broker to determine what applies to your specific policy.
Comprehensive: With this option, you’re covered for any threat or danger other than collision, including theft*, damage or loss caused by vandalism, projectiles, and falling or flying objects such as stones kicked up by a truck in front of you. The important thing to remember is that this coverage applies to your vehicle only, not you or your passengers.

Certain conditions apply. The OMA Auto & Home Insurance Program is underwritten by The Personal General Insurance Inc. in Quebec and by The Personal Insurance Company in all other provinces and territories (collectively carrying on business as “The Personal”). The discounts and savings referred to are for Ontario residents only.  Certain products and services may not be available in all provinces and territories. Auto insurance not available in Manitoba, Saskatchewan or British Columbia due to government-run plans. The clauses and terms pertaining to the described coverages are detailed in the insurance policy. Certain restrictions and exclusions are included therein.


We know that having a complete vehicle insurance plan in Ontario is important — one that will cover you on our snowy back roads in cottage country to the morning gridlock on the 401. Sometimes in this province you never know what driving conditions you’ll face, which is why you need a comprehensive plan. At PC insurance, we take that very seriously. As a car insurance broker, we shop at up to nine car insurance companies to make sure you get the best rates for your specific driving situation. And we are available 24/7 to help you with any claims.
Become an occasional driver under your parents’ policy – Consider being an occasional driver before getting your own car and becoming a primary driver. Occasional drivers pay significantly less for auto insurance. You can build up driving experience while being an occasional driver and end up paying less for auto insurance once you become a primary driver down the road.
Third-party liability: In all provinces and territories in Canada, Third-Party Liability is mandatory. This coverage will pay for the outcome of a lawsuit if you are sued because a collision you caused resulted in the injury or death of another, or resulted in damage to their property. Generally, the minimum required amount of coverage you need to have is $200,000, although typically most drivers have at least $1 million. 
If you drive more than 9,000 km, CAA MyPace may not be for you. When you drive more than 9,000 km on CAA MyPace, you will be charged an administrative fee for each additional 1,000 km increment used. This fee will put you above the price of our traditional Auto Insurance policy so you may wish to discuss options with one of our Agents or your Broker.
Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.
This is what I did 10 years ago when I was in my late-teens and driving. I had an old beat-up car, but my dad was listed as the primary driver and I as the secondary. When I was the primary, my rates were $200. When I was moved to the secondary, they were cut to about $70. Of course, my dad's went up from $60 to $90, but I gladly paid the difference since I ultimately saved $100 a month. I hope this is still the case, but it's worth looking into. TD can give you quotes. I'm with them and I regularly change my insurance information two or three times a year.
Discounts may offer another path to lower auto insurance prices for Brampton drivers. Most, if not all, insurers offer discounts, incentives and price breaks when a driver meets conditions. Insuring more than one car or combining home and auto insurance with one company may qualify you for discounts on those policies. Similarly, insuring more than one driver may lead to price breaks.

Would you like to receive rewards for driving well? Participate in our innovative en-route Auto Program and you could see your insurance discounted by up to 25%*! We send you a wireless device† – at no cost – that's easy to install under your steering column. Once in place, it will track your driving, and you will be rewarded for travelling less, avoiding late-night journeys and braking/accelerating safely. You can rest easy knowing that the entire program is free, and that your premium cannot increase as a result – the data is only used to calculate your discount. Sign up today and save 5% instantly!
Mortgage Savings: Based on the present value of monthly savings over the mortgage term (3-years). The monthly savings is the difference in monthly payments between the lowest and third lowest mortgage rates from major Canadian lenders as of April 24, 2012. These rates are for a 3-Year closed mortgage for $350,000, with an amortization period of 25 years, in the province of Ontario, for a borrower with a good credit rating.
But a new type of insurance policy has arrived in Canada that may be just the ticket to help out the high risk driver. Usage based insurance (UBI) has been adopted by several insurance companies in Ontario that are now placing data collection boxes–run by telematics technology–in the cars of their customers to track and record how they drive, including monitoring such things as quick turns, hard acceleration, braking and overall speed. Several Ontario auto insurance firms now present customers with a five to 10 percent discount to do a trial run. In the course of trying to establish a better driving record, having such objective data in the hands of auto insurance providers is bound to help the high risk driver who conforms to safe driving habits.
The information and examples provided are intended as general information. This information does not constitute legal or insurance advice. You must speak to one of our insurance advisors before purchasing your policy to review additional coverage options and benefits that could be available. Insurance policies contain exclusions and limitations that may affect your coverage and the benefits payable.

Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.

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