Getting married? Moving? Adding a teen driver to your policy? Make sure your insurer still offers you the best deal: As your life changes, so will your auto insurance rates which means your current insurer may no longer be the one who offers you the most affordable coverage. At minimum, you should be putting your insurer’s auto insurance premiums to the test every year by shopping around.
Insurance policies have different levels and amounts in terms of coverage. While minimums in Ontario, like $200,000 in third-party liability, are legally required, higher coverage can help cover supplementary costs in the event of an accident resulting in injuries or a lawsuit. Compulsory car insurance also covers fixing your car in the event of a not-at-fault accident – regardless of who’s behind the wheel.

Know when to cut coverage. Don’t strip away coverage just for the sake of a lower price. You’ll need full coverage car insurance to satisfy the terms of an auto loan, and you’ll want it as long as your car would be a financial burden to replace. But for older cars, you can drop comprehensive and collision coverage, which only pay out up to your car’s current value, minus the deductible.
Something that is quite straight forward for Canadians often turns out to be more complicated for those who are new to Canada. Searching for auto insurance and getting a cheap car insurance policy is one such issue, but we are here to help. Here are some questions you need to answer and steps you need to take to get cheap car insurance if you are new to Canada.
We are high risk auto insurance experts and we work with all the Ontario high risk insurance companies. We'll compare quotes to get you the cheapest rates and help you save as much as possible. We understand that being a high risk driving is challenging and expensive. Our experts will help you get your car insurance back on track and get you back into regular car insurance.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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