Insurers determine your rates based on the year, make, model, engine size, and age of a vehicle. More expensive cars, less safe cars, and commonly stolen cars can cost more, as insurance is based partly on how likely your car is to get stolen, how much it would cost to replace it, and the cost to repair it after a crash. Vehicles with the highest safety ratings have lower insurance rates.

Car insurance premiums are calculated based on a number of factors that determine the risk of you getting into an accident, and how likely it is that you'll make a claim. These risk factors include your driving and accident history, as well as statistical information such as your age, location and number of years driving. The amount and distance you drive, the type of car you own and whether you live in an urban or rural setting can also affect your premiums.
We all know how devastating the physical and emotional toll of an auto accident can be. Yet the financial impact can also be significant, especially when it comes to your automobile, perhaps one of your most treasured – and vulnerable – assets. Even the safest of drivers today face the risk of an accident, with the rise of factors such as distracted driving.   

Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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