If you live in Quebec, the provincial public automobile insurance plan covers you for injury or death due to an automobile accident, no matter who is at fault or where in the world the accident happened. However, under the Automobile Insurance Act, you also have to have third-party liability insurance of at least $50,000 for property damage. This protection, available from private insurers such as The Co-operators, covers any property damage caused to another party.
The majority of Canadians choose to customize their policy beyond the mandatory minimum coverage requirements, though additional coverage options and limit increases may vary by Province. Examples of policy customization would be adding collision and comprehensive coverage to your policy, while upping your accident benefits limits to better suit your needs. Before finalizing your policy make sure to review all coverage options available to you within your Province!
Discounts may offer another path to lower auto insurance prices for Brampton drivers. Most, if not all, insurers offer discounts, incentives and price breaks when a driver meets conditions. Insuring more than one car or combining home and auto insurance with one company may qualify you for discounts on those policies. Similarly, insuring more than one driver may lead to price breaks.

No consideration of your driving experience: Some insurers will accept the fact that you can buy car insurance (with a newly received Canadian driving licence) but will treat you like somebody who has just got a driving licence and has no driving experience. If you are a young driver in Ontario, your rates can reach $250-$350 per month – not a very attractive scenario!
When comparing prices, make sure you know exactly what’s included in your policy. Carefully check the coverage, deductibles and liability limits. While it’s always nice to save money, a lower-priced policy might cost you more in the long run if you discover later that it doesn’t have enough coverage for you and your family. Look for the insurance coverage that best matches your needs, not necessarily the one that costs less.
Among the things insurance companies don’t take into account are: employment history, bankruptcy, your housing situation and history, or your net worth. In Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador, insurers also cannot take your credit score into account when assessing your premiums – but in Nova Scotia they can; in Alberta, they need your permission. Car colour also doesn’t affect rates – it is a widely-believed myth that owners of red cars pay more – they don’t.

Insurance is funny, in a weird sort of way, because rates can vary wildly between insurance companies. Also, premiums often change so the insurance provider who offered you the best rate two years ago, or even last year, may not be the insurer who offers you the best car insurance rate today. That’s why it’s so important to shop around, because the quote you get from one company can be significantly higher (or lower) than the quote you get from another.

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