If you are in your twenties and either working or in school, you can qualify for various discounts, including discounts for good marks at university or college. Teenagers are usually covered under family car insurance plans, and any age group can take advantage of discounts for taking driver’s education classes – which also help you get your graduated licence faster in Ontario.
If you're male and under 25 in Ontario, you're going to get dinged hard. It sucks, but it's the way the system's setup. Other than complaining to your MPP about enacting change, you're mostly out of luck. If you're in a large urban area like Toronto, it's also going to hurt since you're paying for other people's accidents. Here's a map from Kanetix to give you an idea of insurance rate differences across Ontario.

We are high risk auto insurance experts and we work with all the Ontario high risk insurance companies. We'll compare quotes to get you the cheapest rates and help you save as much as possible. We understand that being a high risk driving is challenging and expensive. Our experts will help you get your car insurance back on track and get you back into regular car insurance.

To drive in Canada, auto insurance is required by law from coast-to-coast-to-coast; however, the cost for coverage varies significantly depending on which province or territory you live in. A recent report (2017) commissioned by Ontario’s Ministry of Finance detailed the average auto insurance premiums paid by drivers across the country, and the range in rates is considerable.


Accident Benefits: With the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador, Accident Benefits are mandatory across the country. Accident Benefits will pay for things like medical treatments, income replacement and funeral expenses if you are injured or killed in a car accident. Additionally, some areas of the country require that your auto insurance policy include Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD) and/or Uninsured Automobile coverage. DCPD covers damage to your vehicle or its contents when someone else causes a collision you’re involved in. Uninsured Automobile coverage also offers protection to you if you’re involved in a collision where the other driver, who is at fault for the accident, does not have auto insurance. 
In Alberta, Ontario, the Atlantic provinces, and the territories, there are only private insurers. In British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, basic auto insurance is available from the government and additional coverage is available from private insurers. Quebec, on the other hand, has is it's own unique regulations - public insurance covers injury or death while private insurance covers property damage.
The 407ETR is one of the first examples of uninterrupted access toll highway. There are no toll booths. Vehicles report access using a transponder when entering and exiting the highway. If a car has no transponder, then the license plate is photographed digitally. Monthly billing takes place, with invoices summarizing travel sent to the vehicle’s owner.
As of January 1st 2016, the Ontario government passed a law mandating that insurance companies give drivers a discount on their insurance if they buy and install winter tires on their cars for the winter months. The discount is usually around 5% of your collision coverage, or $72 per vehicle per year, but you will not necessarily get this discount immediately. Some companies make you wait until your policy renews, so make sure you call your insurer to find out how they handle it.
To begin with, you (and all drivers you wish to include in the policy) must have a valid driver's license and be a resident of Canada. Next, insurance companies will look at your prior driving record to determine eligibility and rates. However, rates will vary depending on whether you are looking for a new insurance policy altogether or if you wish to renew an existing one. Other eligibility restrictions may arise from past convictions. This too, will vary depending on when your last conviction occurred and the nature of the conviction.
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