If you’ve chosen to include Collision coverage, Comprehensive coverage, or both on your auto insurance policy, the broker or agent you speak with when discussing your insurance needs will ask you about deductibles. Specifically, you’ll be asked how much you’d like your deductibles to be. Give this question some thought before answering because you’ll want to pick a deductible that fits your budget and will not cause financial stress should you need to submit a claim. While it’s true, your car insurance premiums will be lower with a higher deductible, your deductible needs to align with your personal finances. In general, the most common choices for deductibles are $1,000 or $500; however, there may be other deductible options available to you that may better fit your needs.

If you're in an accident or fender bender, you may think that a run-of-the-mill cheap car insurance policy covers you well enough to fix your car. But what if it doesn't? While saving a little money on your monthly bill may work in the short term, after an accident your car may not be covered, leaving you to pay for car repairs out of your own pocket. What initially seemed like a quick way to save will end up costing you more money.


Similarly, many Ontario auto insurance companies have discounts available to customers who install additional safety features, upgrades or alarms in their vehicle. To save money, high risk drivers should also consider trading in their cars for a different model equipped with better safety equipment or one that rates low in car theft frequency or fares better in collisions. Information is available from the Insurance Bureau of Canada, which issues a Canadian Loss Experience Automobile Rating (CLEAR) that’s used by several Ontario auto insurance companies in setting premiums.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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