Insurers determine your rates based on the year, make, model, engine size, and age of a vehicle. More expensive cars, less safe cars, and commonly stolen cars can cost more, as insurance is based partly on how likely your car is to get stolen, how much it would cost to replace it, and the cost to repair it after a crash. Vehicles with the highest safety ratings have lower insurance rates.
In order to operate a vehicle in Canada, you are required to have a valid car insurance policy in place at all times. Car insurance policy requirements vary from province to province, depending on the type of insurance system each is mandated by (public vs. private). However, you need to have a minimum amount of third-party liability insurance, to protect yourself financially in the event that you injure someone or damage their car/property. You’ll also need a minimum amount of accident benefits protection, which provides you with coverage for any medical/rehabilitation costs that occur as result from an accident.
Raising the deductible limits on collision and comprehensive coverage lowers monthly insurance premiums. By taking on more financial responsibility in the case of an accident, a driver lowers day to day costs. A driver must be ready, however, to absorb these costs if an accident occurs. Note that in some cases where a driver is not at fault, other insurance provisions or companies may cover some or all deductible amounts. Check with your agent or broker to determine what applies to your specific policy.

It might take a bit of time and work, but in the end you can save yourself a lot of money. Remember that there are so many factors that affect how much you pay, and so much that constantly changes, that you can do this again every so often and again find a better deal if you’re willing to put in the work. Changing companies does not negatively affect your rates.
Among the things insurance companies don’t take into account are: employment history, bankruptcy, your housing situation and history, or your net worth. In Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador, insurers also cannot take your credit score into account when assessing your premiums – but in Nova Scotia they can; in Alberta, they need your permission. Car colour also doesn’t affect rates – it is a widely-believed myth that owners of red cars pay more – they don’t.

Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.


Other insurance conditions may arise depending on the type of vehicle, its use, and any customizations or modifications made to the vehicle. For example, if you have altered your vehicle to enhance its performance or appearance, most insurance companies would need to assess the vehicle to determine if they could insure it. If you plan on modifying your vehicle, call us first! We will let you know if the changes you plan on making could have an impact on your policy.
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