This is what I did 10 years ago when I was in my late-teens and driving. I had an old beat-up car, but my dad was listed as the primary driver and I as the secondary. When I was the primary, my rates were $200. When I was moved to the secondary, they were cut to about $70. Of course, my dad's went up from $60 to $90, but I gladly paid the difference since I ultimately saved $100 a month. I hope this is still the case, but it's worth looking into. TD can give you quotes. I'm with them and I regularly change my insurance information two or three times a year.
Car insurance premiums are calculated based on a number of factors that determine the risk of you getting into an accident, and how likely it is that you'll make a claim. These risk factors include your driving and accident history, as well as statistical information such as your age, location and number of years driving. The amount and distance you drive, the type of car you own and whether you live in an urban or rural setting can also affect your premiums.
Like in the rest of the province of Ontario, the minimum amount of third-party liability coverage required by law in Toronto is $200,000. It is often recommended that this number be significantly higher in order to properly help cover your family — especially in a dense urban centre like Toronto, which is surrounded by 400 series highways — traffic accidents are more common than rural areas.

Accident Benefits: With the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador, Accident Benefits are mandatory across the country. Accident Benefits will pay for things like medical treatments, income replacement and funeral expenses if you are injured or killed in a car accident. Additionally, some areas of the country require that your auto insurance policy include Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD) and/or Uninsured Automobile coverage. DCPD covers damage to your vehicle or its contents when someone else causes a collision you’re involved in. Uninsured Automobile coverage also offers protection to you if you’re involved in a collision where the other driver, who is at fault for the accident, does not have auto insurance. 
As of January 1st 2016, the Ontario government passed a law mandating that insurance companies give drivers a discount on their insurance if they buy and install winter tires on their cars for the winter months. The discount is usually around 5% of your collision coverage, or $72 per vehicle per year, but you will not necessarily get this discount immediately. Some companies make you wait until your policy renews, so make sure you call your insurer to find out how they handle it.

Many Ontario drivers have additional third party insurance coverage. This is a wise move since the provincial requirement is only for $200,000. Settlements from serious accidents often exceed this amount. Any amount in excess of insurance coverage remains the responsibility of the driver. To guard against serious financial strain, it’s common to add liability coverage to $500,000 and beyond.
Obtaining cheap auto insurance quotes from our online insurance providers has never been simpler. All you need to do to get cheap auto insurance rates for any or all of your vehicles is to provide some basic information. Our independent agents will compare insurance company quotes and notify you by email or phone. The appropriate state laws and regulations will be applied to provide you with a speedy auto insurance quote. Whether you just want to save money, are classified as a safe driver or have minor to major dings on your driving record, you may still be able to get much lower rates. The good news is that by shopping Affordable Insurance of Jax for the best rates, you always have free access to cheap auto insurance quotes.

Car insurance premiums are calculated based on a number of factors that determine the risk of you getting into an accident, and how likely it is that you'll make a claim. These risk factors include your driving and accident history, as well as statistical information such as your age, location and number of years driving. The amount and distance you drive, the type of car you own and whether you live in an urban or rural setting can also affect your premiums.

Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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