The more time you spend on the road, the higher your chances of being in a collision or getting a ticket. If you can, start carpooling with colleagues to work, taking public transit, biking or walking because if you can find ways to spend less time commuting, not only could you benefit from a lower premium, but you’ll also decrease your chances of getting a ticket or being in a collision. There are also health benefits too if you bike or walk to work instead of taking the car.
If something sounds too good to be true, it likely is, and this is true for Ontario car insurance. As you compare car insurance quotes, it is not recommended to seek only the cheapest overall price. Just as a cheap Internet provider with slow service is not preferable, a quote that is significantly lower than the competition likely has hidden downfalls that you should look into. As you compare coverage, make sure to consider things such as the deductible. After all, the point of insurance is to have peace of mind in the event you were to get into an accident. The added investment in a policy that has a lower deductible is often worth the extra monthly payment.

Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.
This is the most important tip you will read in this guide. You should always shop around for car insurance – when you first get insurance, when your policy is up for renewal, and so on. There is never a reason not to, and in just a year enough can have changed in your situation to affect your rates. In addition, some companies offer discounts to attract or retain new customers so you should always be on the lookout for such deals.

Not all collisions affect your insurance rates, but crashes where you’re deemed at fault will drive up your premiums. Insurers care about your three-year driving record, because that’s how long convictions stay on your driving record. A single speeding ticket may not have a huge impact on your premiums, but repeated infractions could cost you – and serious driving crimes that result in court convictions can really hit hard.


A couple of at-fault collisions, a few traffic violations or an impaired driving conviction is all it takes to get a high risk driver designation from an auto insurance company in Ontario. That sets you up for high auto insurance premiums for several years or perhaps worse, an outright cancellation or non-renewal of your existing Ontario auto insurance policy.
As a resident of Ontario, you will automatically qualify for a 5% discount on eligible coverage* if you complete a car insurance quote using our online quoter right now. The personalized quote will also be emailed to you so you can refer to it at any time. If you want to save up to an additional 25% on your premium, download and use the TD MyAdvantage app!
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