The chart above illustrates the average auto insurance premiums across Canada. Typically the province of Ontario is characterized by the highest auto insurance rates. Quebec, as a rule, has more affordable car insurance premiums since the health part of the insurance (e.g. bodily injuries) is covered by the government. Not all provinces allow customers to choose from a variety of insurers. Three provinces have crown companies being the only source of vehicle insurance:
In order to operate a vehicle in Canada, you are required to have a valid car insurance policy in place at all times. Car insurance policy requirements vary from province to province, depending on the type of insurance system each is mandated by (public vs. private). However, you need to have a minimum amount of third-party liability insurance, to protect yourself financially in the event that you injure someone or damage their car/property. You’ll also need a minimum amount of accident benefits protection, which provides you with coverage for any medical/rehabilitation costs that occur as result from an accident.
Finding the best available car insurance quotes in Ontario isn't just about getting coverage at a cost that's inexpensive. While cost is an important and sometimes deciding factor, what's most important is the level and amount of coverage you'll receive, as well as knowing that you'll receive customer care that you can rely on. You can be certain to receive the total package when you choose The Co-operators. We respect your needs AND your budget with the personalized car insurance quotes we provide. Select the city nearest you to get local car insurance quotes in Ontario, today.

If something sounds too good to be true, it likely is, and this is true for Ontario car insurance. As you compare car insurance quotes, it is not recommended to seek only the cheapest overall price. Just as a cheap Internet provider with slow service is not preferable, a quote that is significantly lower than the competition likely has hidden downfalls that you should look into. As you compare coverage, make sure to consider things such as the deductible. After all, the point of insurance is to have peace of mind in the event you were to get into an accident. The added investment in a policy that has a lower deductible is often worth the extra monthly payment.


Cutting back car insurance coverage to meet the provincial minimum requirement is only an option for a few drivers who are able and willing to take on the financial costs of repairing or replacing a vehicle after an accident. The standard provincial policy does not include collision or comprehensive insurance provisions. However, drivers financing car purchases may find that lenders have insurance requirements.

While vacationing in California, you have a serious accident for which you are held responsible, leaving the other driver seriously injured. The other driver decides to sue, which results in a judgment against you for the damages to the other driver's vehicle, medical expenses and loss of revenue. The settlement is expensive, but your Additional Third Party Liability helps to cover it.
Like in the rest of the province of Ontario, the minimum amount of third-party liability coverage required by law in Toronto is $200,000. It is often recommended that this number be significantly higher in order to properly help cover your family — especially in a dense urban centre like Toronto, which is surrounded by 400 series highways — traffic accidents are more common than rural areas.
What you use your vehicle for and how often you’re behind the wheel can be a contributing factor in setting car insurance premiums. To get the best rates possible, always try to be as specific as you can about your driving habits. You might consider installing a Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) unit on your car, which tracks where and how you drive, to provide proof of your driving habits. These devices often reward good driving behavior (and penalize bad driving habits such as speeding).
Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.

Here's what happens in case of a covered accident: First, you report a claim — online, or through your agent. If there's damage to your vehicle, you can choose your own repair shop or one of our preferred auto shops, which provide great repairs and guaranteed completion dates. Then, subject to the terms and conditions of your auto insurance policy, we pay for the damages. Our claim specialists help find repair facilities in your area, keep you updated on work being done, and process your claim quickly and efficiently.
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