Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
Insurers determine your rates based on the year, make, model, engine size, and age of a vehicle. More expensive cars, less safe cars, and commonly stolen cars can cost more, as insurance is based partly on how likely your car is to get stolen, how much it would cost to replace it, and the cost to repair it after a crash. Vehicles with the highest safety ratings have lower insurance rates.
Insurance is funny, in a weird sort of way, because rates can vary wildly between insurance companies. Also, premiums often change so the insurance provider who offered you the best rate two years ago, or even last year, may not be the insurer who offers you the best car insurance rate today. That’s why it’s so important to shop around, because the quote you get from one company can be significantly higher (or lower) than the quote you get from another.

In order to operate a vehicle in Canada, you are required to have a valid car insurance policy in place at all times. Car insurance policy requirements vary from province to province, depending on the type of insurance system each is mandated by (public vs. private). However, you need to have a minimum amount of third-party liability insurance, to protect yourself financially in the event that you injure someone or damage their car/property. You’ll also need a minimum amount of accident benefits protection, which provides you with coverage for any medical/rehabilitation costs that occur as result from an accident.


Also, these collision policies are good for cars that have little to no value. For example, a person who paid for their car years ago and could only get a few hundred dollars for the car can use a collision policy to save money on car insurance every month. Ontario insurance agents can offer people collision coverage that keeps them legally entitled to drive but not cost them very much every month.

Cutting back car insurance coverage to meet the provincial minimum requirement is only an option for a few drivers who are able and willing to take on the financial costs of repairing or replacing a vehicle after an accident. The standard provincial policy does not include collision or comprehensive insurance provisions. However, drivers financing car purchases may find that lenders have insurance requirements.
For those placed in this unfortunate situation, there is an insurance pool called the Facility Association, which serves as a last resort for those unable to convince an auto insurance service provider to insure their vehicle with an appropriate policy. However, a checkered driving history and the high risk associated with unsafe driving practices will still work against candidates as far as auto insurance costs go.
Credit Cards Savings: Based on avoidance of unnecessary card fees and correctly chosen insurance protection via a credit card, including $280 in rental car insurance (renting a car for 2 weeks per year), $70 in card fee (fee difference for cards with similar insurance protection), $70 in travel medical insurance for one person for three weeks, and $80 for extended warranty for one electronic device purchased during a year.
When it comes to auto insurance, especially auto insurance in Ontario, many people question whether or not there’s really a way to save money on it. There is! While there are many ways to save, none are more effective than shopping around. How can we be so sure? Well, on average, InsuranceHotline.com shoppers save $450* after comparing car insurance quotes on our site. And, all it takes is a few minutes to compare quotes from our network of over 30 insurance providers. 
Those that will continue your driving record: Some companies will consider your previous experience and will offer you a rate based on how long you have been driving, no matter where you got your on-road experience. Check with a broker to see which companies consider previous out-of-Canada experience so you can reduce your chances of a denial and increase your chances of getting the best possible rate.

This assessment – of your recommended insurance coverages – is based on your responses to the preceding questionnaire. The coverages you see are those determined to be the most important for you – but are by no means the only options available. If you have insurance needs beyond what you see here, one of our advisors can guide you through our other offerings.

®belairdirect. and ®Little Knight Design are registered trademarks of Belair Insurance Company Inc. Certain conditions, limitations and exclusions apply to all our offers. Offers may change without notice. Not everyone will qualify for a phone or online quote. Insurance products may be underwritten by either Belair Insurance Company Inc. Services provided by belairdirect Agency Inc. ©2018 Belair Insurance Company Inc. All rights reserved.
A car insurance deductible, in essence, is a predetermined amount of money required to be paid by the policyholder when a claim is filed. In Ontario, deductibles can vary, with standard base amounts at about $500 for collision coverage and $300 for comprehensive coverage. A higher deductible can mean lower car insurance premiums but means more money comes out of your pocket during a claim.
There are alternatives for those who are motivated. The first step is to start shopping for competitive auto insurance rates in Ontario. Using a superior comparison site such as Rates.ca will help any driver find a auto insurance provider in Ontario for a better price than expected. All auto insurance agents and brokers in Ontario do not necessarily operate the same and will arrive at their own assessment, which often means drivers will be presented with a range of insurance options with different cost structures. Even though drivers still fall in the high risk category, it represents an opportunity to start improving your driving record. It’s best to discuss your accidents, infractions and convictions openly and to find out how long a time period they will count against you, as this varies from province to province.
Other discounts can include vehicle amenities, such as using snow tires for winter driving or adding approved anti-theft devices. Usage-based insurance programs are on offer from some insurers. These track how your vehicle operates. Factors such as acceleration and braking report through a smart phone or diagnostic device. Participating insurance companies offer a discount when you sign up for the program and good driving habits potentially generate further savings.

Because you indicated you occasionally have non-family members as passengers in your car, we recommend Additional Third Party Liability for you. The more passengers you have in your car, the more damages you can be liable for in the event of an accident – not only are non-family members not covered by most standard insurance, they are also more likely to file law suits.


If you are self-employed, income means your share (proportionate to your ownership interest) of the income or loss of the business net of all business expenses except income taxes. If you are an incorporated business owner, you may also include any wages, salary, fees or commissions which the incorporated business paid to you as an employee of the business.
Similarly, many Ontario auto insurance companies have discounts available to customers who install additional safety features, upgrades or alarms in their vehicle. To save money, high risk drivers should also consider trading in their cars for a different model equipped with better safety equipment or one that rates low in car theft frequency or fares better in collisions. Information is available from the Insurance Bureau of Canada, which issues a Canadian Loss Experience Automobile Rating (CLEAR) that’s used by several Ontario auto insurance companies in setting premiums.
While Toronto politicians have made efforts to encourage the use of transit and bike lanes, the truth is that more and more residents are choosing to drive. If you are one of them, it is crucial that you have a quality car insurance policy that will cover you when the unexpected occurs. By following these guidelines, you can get the best coverage for your money.
But a new type of insurance policy has arrived in Canada that may be just the ticket to help out the high risk driver. Usage based insurance (UBI) has been adopted by several insurance companies in Ontario that are now placing data collection boxes–run by telematics technology–in the cars of their customers to track and record how they drive, including monitoring such things as quick turns, hard acceleration, braking and overall speed. Several Ontario auto insurance firms now present customers with a five to 10 percent discount to do a trial run. In the course of trying to establish a better driving record, having such objective data in the hands of auto insurance providers is bound to help the high risk driver who conforms to safe driving habits.
It’s always helpful to ask your colleagues at work, your family members or close friends to recommend their car insurance firm or broker in Toronto, especially of course, if they are happy with the car insurance rate and satisfied with the service provided. In some cases the recommendation is rewarded with a slight, but always welcome, car insurance discount for the referee and somewhat of an incentive for you to provide similar favorable mentions in the future.
It might take a bit of time and work, but in the end you can save yourself a lot of money. Remember that there are so many factors that affect how much you pay, and so much that constantly changes, that you can do this again every so often and again find a better deal if you’re willing to put in the work. Changing companies does not negatively affect your rates.
×