A bit of a history lesson: Google introduced its online shopping comparison website Google Compare in the U.K. three years ago. Google Compare is available in the U.S., although currently all you can search for is credit cards. Google is keeping mum on its possible entry into the auto insurance space. However, Google has already been licensed to sell auto insurance in more than 26 U.S. states after working on the project for the past two years, according to Forester Research blogger Ellen Carney.
Other discounts can include vehicle amenities, such as using snow tires for winter driving or adding approved anti-theft devices. Usage-based insurance programs are on offer from some insurers. These track how your vehicle operates. Factors such as acceleration and braking report through a smart phone or diagnostic device. Participating insurance companies offer a discount when you sign up for the program and good driving habits potentially generate further savings.

Become an occasional driver under your parents’ policy – Consider being an occasional driver before getting your own car and becoming a primary driver. Occasional drivers pay significantly less for auto insurance. You can build up driving experience while being an occasional driver and end up paying less for auto insurance once you become a primary driver down the road.


Dashboard camera, or “dashcams”, is a new technology that is becoming increasingly popular. The appeal is that if there is a dispute of who is at fault in an accident with no other witness, or the other party flees the scene, you have objective proof to fall back on. There is no mainstream or common discount from most insurance companies, at least not yet. There are some ways they can help lower your rates indirectly, however:
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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