Some classes of vehicle ownership, or use, are "Crown Exempt" from the requirement to be covered under the Act including vehicles owned or operated by certain councils and local authorities, national park authorities, education authorities, police authorities, fire authorities, health service bodies, the security services and vehicles used to or from Shipping Salvage purposes. Although exempt from the requirement to insure, this provides no immunity against claims being made against them, so an otherwise Crown Exempt authority may choose to insure conventionally, preferring to incur the known expense of insurance premiums rather than accept the open-ended exposure of effectively, self-insuring under Crown Exemption.
Cents Per Mile Now[48] (1986) advocates classified odometer-mile rates, a type of usage-based insurance. After the company's risk factors have been applied, and the customer has accepted the per-mile rate offered, then customers buy prepaid miles of insurance protection as needed, like buying gallons of gasoline (litres of petrol). Insurance automatically ends when the odometer limit (recorded on the car's insurance ID card) is reached, unless more distance is bought. Customers keep track of miles on their own odometer to know when to buy more. The company does no after-the-fact billing of the customer, and the customer doesn't have to estimate a "future annual mileage" figure for the company to obtain a discount. In the event of a traffic stop, an officer could easily verify that the insurance is current, by comparing the figure on the insurance card to that on the odometer.
Having a third-party insurance plan is compulsory for all automobiles plying on the Indian roads. This insurance plan provides the coverage arising out of for injuries or damages caused to other people. The beneficiary is third-party only. The prudent way to get coverage for the losses or damages caused to the insured vehicle is buying a comprehensive insurance plan. It provides the coverage for third-party liability along with own damage caused to the insured automobile.
Type of car: If you have an expensive or powerful car then you are seen as a higher risk for a number of reasons. If it’s expensive, it has a higher risk of being stolen. If it’s powerful, it’s deemed more at risk of getting into an accident driving at speed. If you want to see how your car impacts your insurance, you can check which insurance group it’s in for an indication.  

Yes, you surely can avail the NCB if you change your insurance provider at the time of renewing the policy. All you would need to do is producing a proof of the earned NCB from your current insurance provider. You can produce the original copy of your expiring policy and a certification that you haven’t filed any claim for the (expiring) insurance plan. A renewal notice or a letter stating that you’re entitled to the NCB from your previous insurance provider can be a proof for this.
The minimum coverage defined by German law for car liability insurance / third party personal insurance is €7,500,000 for bodily injury (damage to people), €500,000 euro for property damage and €50,000 for financial/fortune loss which is in no direct or indirect coherence with bodily injury or property damage.[15] Insurance companies usually offer all-in/combined single limit insurances of €50,000,000 or €100,000,000 (about €141,000,000) for bodily injury, property damage and other financial/fortune loss (usually with a bodily injury coverage limitation of €8-15,000,000 for each bodily injured person).

The insurance certificate or cover note issued by the insurance company constitutes the only legal evidence that the policy to which the certificate relates satisfies the requirements of the relevant law applicable in Great Britain, Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Island of Guernsey, the Island of Jersey and the Island of Alderney. The Act states that an authorised person, such as a police officer, may require a driver to produce an insurance certificate for inspection. If the driver cannot show the document immediately on request, and evidence of insurance cannot be found by other means such as the MID, then the Police are empowered to seize the vehicle instantly.
The immediate impounding of an apparently uninsured vehicle replaces the former method of dealing with insurance spot-checks where drivers were issued with an HORT/1 (so-called because the order was form number 1 issued by the Home Office Road Traffic dept). This 'ticket' was an order requiring that within seven days, from midnight of the date of issue, the driver concerned was to take a valid insurance certificate (and usually other driving documents as well) to a police station of the driver's choice. Failure to produce an insurance certificate was, and still is, an offence. The HORT/1 was commonly known – even by the issuing authorities when dealing with the public – as a "Producer". As these are seldom issued now and the MID relied upon to indicate the presence of insurance or not, it is incumbent upon the insurance industry to accurately and swiftly update the MID with current policy details and insurers that fail to do so can be penalised by their regulating body.
In South Australia, since July 2016, CTP is no longer provided by the Motor Accident Commission.The government has now licensed four private insurers - AAMI, Allianz, QBE and SGIC, to offer CTP insurance SA. The scheme allocates one provider for 3 years as part of vehicle registration. After July 2019, vehicle owners can choose a different CTP insurer and new insurers may also enter the market. [6]
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