In New South Wales, each vehicle must be insured before it can be registered. It is often called a 'greenslip,'[4] because of its colour. There are six licensed CTP insurers in New South Wales. Suncorp holds licences for GIO and AAMI and Allianz holds Allianz and CIC Allianz licences. The remaining two licences are held by QBE and NRMA Insurance (NRMA). APIA and Shannons and InsureMyRide insurance also supply CTP insurance licensed by GIO.
More commonly purchased is third party, fire and theft. This covers all third party liabilities and also covers the vehicle owner against the destruction of the vehicle by fire (whether malicious or due to a vehicle fault) and theft of the insured vehicle. It may or may not cover vandalism. This kind of insurance and the two preceding types do not cover damage to the vehicle caused by the driver or other hazards.
[1] Availability varies. Enrollment discount applies during data collection; final discount is calculated on driving behavior and could be zero. Discounts do not apply to all coverage elements; actual savings vary by state, coverage selections, rating factors and policy changes. Final discount applies at the next policy renewal and remains until drivers or vehicles on the policy change.
Yes, motor insurance is transferable to the purchaser of the automobile. All you have to do is inform in writing about the transfer to its insurance provider. The original owner of the car needs to fill out a new proposal form. A nominal fee is charged for the insurance transfer along with the recovery of No Claim Bonus from the transfer date till policy expires on a pro-rata basis.
The 12-month policy will generally start on the date that the last car insurance is up for renewal, with short-term cover used to protect the other cars in the interim. For example, if you have one car that needs to be insured from February and another in June, the February car will be insured first but the policy will actually renew in June when both cars are covered. After the last car has been insured for a full 12 months, the policy will renew each year until you choose another policy.

Third-party vehicle insurance is a mandatory requirement in Indonesia and each individual car and motorcycle must be insured or the vehicle will not be considered legal. Therefore, a motorist cannot drive the vehicle until it is insured. Third Party vehicle insurance is included through a levy in the vehicle registration fee which is paid to the government agency Samsat (Sistem Administrasi Manunggal di bawah Satu Atap), which is responsible for cars and roads.[18] Third-Party Vehicle Insurance is regulated under Act No. 34 Year 1964 Re: Road Traffic Accident Fund and merely covers Bodily injury, and managed by a SOE named PT. Jasa Raharja (Persero).[19] The Indonesian government has a road insurance fund which includes life insurance for traffic accidents. The annual fee is called the Compulsory Contribution Fund for Traffic Accidents or Sumbangan Wajib Dana Kecelakaan Lalu Lintas Jalan.[18]
The deductible is the amount of which the claim would be payable. Generally, a normal standard or compulsory deductible for most of the automobiles that range from Rupees 50 for the two-wheeler automobile to Rupees 500 for private four-wheelers and commercial automobiles that enhance according to the carrying capacity or cubic capacity of the automobile. Though, there could be cases where the insurance provider might enforce extra deductible which depends on the vehicle’s age or if the claims frequency is comparatively higher.
Several jurisdictions have experimented with a "pay-as-you-drive" insurance plan which utilizes either a tracking device in the vehicle or vehicle diagnostics. This would address issues of uninsured motorists by providing additional options and also charge based on the miles (kilometers) driven, which could theoretically increase the efficiency of the insurance, through streamlined collection.[3]
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