Metromile also uses an OBDII-based system for their mileage-based insurance. They offer a true pay-per-mile insurance where behavior or driving style is not taken into account, and the user only pays a base rate along with a fixed rate per mile.[53] The OBD-II device measures mileage and then transmits mileage data to servers. This is supposed to be an affordable car insurance policy for low-mileage drivers. Metromile is currently only offering personal car insurance policies and is available in California, Oregon, Washington, and Illinois.[54]
Admiral Group plc is registered in England and Wales at Tŷ Admiral, David Street, Cardiff. CF10 2EH (Reg No: 03849958). Admiral Financial Services Limited (Reg No: 10255225) is a subsidiary of Admiral Group plc and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Firm reference number: 771862). EUI Limited (Reg No: 02686904) is a subsidiary of Admiral Group plc and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Firm reference number: 309378). These details can be confirmed by visiting the Financial Services Register, www.fca.org.uk/register. EUI Limited acts for, and on behalf of, other regulated insurance companies. Further details may be provided on request.
Under the cents-per-mile system, rewards for driving less are delivered automatically, without the need for administratively cumbersome and costly GPS technology. Uniform per-mile exposure measurement for the first time provides the basis for statistically valid rate classes. Insurer premium income automatically keeps pace with increases or decreases in driving activity, cutting back on resulting insurer demand for rate increases and preventing today's windfalls to insurers, when decreased driving activity lowers costs but not premiums.
A compulsory car insurance scheme was first introduced in the United Kingdom with the Road Traffic Act 1930. This ensured that all vehicle owners and drivers had to be insured for their liability for injury or death to third parties whilst their vehicle was being used on a public road.[1] Germany enacted similar legislation in 1939 called the "Act on the Implementation of Compulsory Insurance for Motor Vehicle Owners."[2]
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