Liability insurance pays for damage to someone else’s property or for injury to other persons resulting from an accident for which the insured is judged legally liable; collision insurance pays for damage to the insured car if it collides with another vehicle or object; comprehensive insurance pays for damage to the insured car resulting from fire or theft or many other causes; medical-payment insurance covers medical treatment for the policyholder and his passengers.

While most of us are eager in availing no-claim bonuses (a discount in premium at renewal if no claim is made during the policy term), but we hardly pay attention towards other smaller discounts which can add up to a substantial amount. All comprehensive insurance plans offer reward for good claim history, with a discount which could be 50% of the premium.

In 1930, the UK Government introduced a law that required every person who used a vehicle on the road to have at least third-party personal injury insurance. Today, this law is defined by the Road Traffic Act 1988,[31] (generally referred to as the RTA 1988 as amended) which was last modified in 1991[citation needed]. The Act requires that motorists either be insured, or have made a specified deposit (£500,000 in 1991) and keeps the sum deposited with the Accountant General of the Supreme Court, against liability for injuries to others (including passengers) and for damage to other persons' property, resulting from use of a vehicle on a public road or in other public places.
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There are many factors such as IDV, deductibles, seating capacity, cubic capacity, previous insurance history etc. that affect the insurance premium that you would pay. For comprehensive insurance plans, premium charges vary insurance provider per insurance provider on the basis of the coverage provided. Compare insurance premiums so that you get the best quote.

Having a third-party insurance plan is compulsory for all automobiles plying on the Indian roads. This insurance plan provides the coverage arising out of for injuries or damages caused to other people. The beneficiary is third-party only. The prudent way to get coverage for the losses or damages caused to the insured vehicle is buying a comprehensive insurance plan. It provides the coverage for third-party liability along with own damage caused to the insured automobile.


You might have a roommate or family member on your policy that no longer drives your vehicles. Or maybe you have a vehicle on your policy that is no longer being driven. Making sure driver and vehicle information is up to date may save you money. Keep in mind, if you do go down to just one car on your policy, you will lose the multi-vehicle discount.

In September 2012, it was announced that the Competition Commission had launched an investigation into the UK system for credit repairs and credit hire of an alternative vehicle leading to claims from third parties following an accident. Where their client is considered to be not at fault, Accident Management Companies will take over the running of their client's claim and arrange everything for them, usually on a 'No Win - No Fee' basis. It was shown that the insurers of the at-fault vehicle, were unable to intervene in order to have control over the costs that were applied to the claim by means of repairs, storage, vehicle hire, referral fees and personal injury. The subsequent cost of some items submitted for consideration has been a cause for concern over recent years as this has caused an increase in the premium costs, contrary to the general duty of all involved to mitigate the cost of claims. Also, the recent craze of "Cash for crash" has substantially raised the cost of policies. This is where two parties arrange a collision between their vehicles and one driver making excessive claims for damage and non-existent injuries to themselves and the passengers that they had arranged to be "in the vehicle" at the time of the collision. Another recent development has seen crashes being caused deliberately by a driver "slamming" on their brakes so that the driver behind hits them, this is usually carried out at roundabouts, when the following driver is looking to the right for oncoming traffic and does not notice that the vehicle in front has suddenly stopped for no reason. The 'staging' of a motor collision on the Public Highway for the purpose of attempting an insurance fraud is considered by the Courts to be organised crime and upon conviction is dealt with as such.


If a LPG or CNG kit is installed in your automobile, you must inform the Road Transport Authority’s office, from where the automobile was registered so that they can modify the necessary changes in the registration certificate of the automobile. The insurance provider should be informed as well so that it can provide the coverage to the kit on the payment of additional premium as per the kit’s value under Own Damage Section.
The deductible is the amount of which the claim would be payable. Generally, a normal standard or compulsory deductible for most of the automobiles that range from Rupees 50 for the two-wheeler automobile to Rupees 500 for private four-wheelers and commercial automobiles that enhance according to the carrying capacity or cubic capacity of the automobile. Though, there could be cases where the insurance provider might enforce extra deductible which depends on the vehicle’s age or if the claims frequency is comparatively higher.
According to the Insurance Information Institute, in the United States in the early 21st century, about two-thirds of the money spent on premiums for private passenger auto insurance went to claims. More than half of this amount covered car damage. The rest covered personal injuries. The remaining third of the money spent on premiums covered insurance companies’ expenses—such as commissions, dividends to policyholders, and company operations—and contributed to their profits.

Senior drivers are often eligible for retirement discounts, reflecting the lower average miles driven by this age group. However, rates may increase for senior drivers after age 65, due to increased risk associated with much older drivers. Typically, the increased risk for drivers over 65 years of age is associated with slower reflexes, reaction times, and being more injury-prone.[citation needed]

The Road Traffic Act, 1933 requires all drivers of mechanically propelled vehicles in public places to have at least third-party insurance, or to have obtained exemption – generally by depositing a (large) sum of money to the High Court as a guarantee against claims. In 1933, this figure was set at £15,000.[21] The Road Traffic Act, 1961[22] (which is currently in force) repealed the 1933 act but replaced these sections with functionally identical sections.
Several jurisdictions have experimented with a "pay-as-you-drive" insurance plan which utilizes either a tracking device in the vehicle or vehicle diagnostics. This would address issues of uninsured motorists by providing additional options and also charge based on the miles (kilometers) driven, which could theoretically increase the efficiency of the insurance, through streamlined collection.[3]
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