In September 2012, it was announced that the Competition Commission had launched an investigation into the UK system for credit repairs and credit hire of an alternative vehicle leading to claims from third parties following an accident. Where their client is considered to be not at fault, Accident Management Companies will take over the running of their client's claim and arrange everything for them, usually on a 'No Win - No Fee' basis. It was shown that the insurers of the at-fault vehicle, were unable to intervene in order to have control over the costs that were applied to the claim by means of repairs, storage, vehicle hire, referral fees and personal injury. The subsequent cost of some items submitted for consideration has been a cause for concern over recent years as this has caused an increase in the premium costs, contrary to the general duty of all involved to mitigate the cost of claims. Also, the recent craze of "Cash for crash" has substantially raised the cost of policies. This is where two parties arrange a collision between their vehicles and one driver making excessive claims for damage and non-existent injuries to themselves and the passengers that they had arranged to be "in the vehicle" at the time of the collision. Another recent development has seen crashes being caused deliberately by a driver "slamming" on their brakes so that the driver behind hits them, this is usually carried out at roundabouts, when the following driver is looking to the right for oncoming traffic and does not notice that the vehicle in front has suddenly stopped for no reason. The 'staging' of a motor collision on the Public Highway for the purpose of attempting an insurance fraud is considered by the Courts to be organised crime and upon conviction is dealt with as such.

The deductible is the amount of which the claim would be payable. Generally, a normal standard or compulsory deductible for most of the automobiles that range from Rupees 50 for the two-wheeler automobile to Rupees 500 for private four-wheelers and commercial automobiles that enhance according to the carrying capacity or cubic capacity of the automobile. Though, there could be cases where the insurance provider might enforce extra deductible which depends on the vehicle’s age or if the claims frequency is comparatively higher.


Yes, you surely can avail the NCB if you change your insurance provider at the time of renewing the policy. All you would need to do is producing a proof of the earned NCB from your current insurance provider. You can produce the original copy of your expiring policy and a certification that you haven’t filed any claim for the (expiring) insurance plan. A renewal notice or a letter stating that you’re entitled to the NCB from your previous insurance provider can be a proof for this.
Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by U K Insurance Limited. Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ Registered in England and Wales No.1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. Registration number 202810. The Financial Services Register can be accessed through www.fca.org.uk.
Generally, a motor insurance policy is valid for one year and it has to be renewed prior the due date in order to avoid any lapse in the policy. For a smoother insurance experience always pay the insurance premium before the due date. If your policy has lapsed then the automobile would undergo an inspection. In addition to that, if a comprehensive insurance policy remains lapse for a time period of more than the benefit of “No Claim Bonus” isn’t provided.
But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.
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