Comprehensive: With this option, you’re covered for any threat or danger other than collision, including theft*, damage or loss caused by vandalism, projectiles, and falling or flying objects such as stones kicked up by a truck in front of you. The important thing to remember is that this coverage applies to your vehicle only, not you or your passengers.
These policies are unique because ride-share drivers are in a unique position. You use your personal vehicle for business purposes, blurring the lines between commercial and personal auto insurance coverage. Ride-share insurance was created to fill that gap. To learn more about insurance for Uber drivers and similar ride-sharing programs, visit our ride-share insurance page here. 
The more time you spend on the road, the higher your chances of being in a collision or getting a ticket. If you can, start carpooling with colleagues to work, taking public transit, biking or walking because if you can find ways to spend less time commuting, not only could you benefit from a lower premium, but you’ll also decrease your chances of getting a ticket or being in a collision. There are also health benefits too if you bike or walk to work instead of taking the car.

In general, the cancellation fee is a percentage of your premium and the percentage charged is determined by how far along you are into the term of your policy. For example, you’ll pay more if your current policy is only four months old than if you’re nine months into your coverage. The cancellation fee charged is basically a sliding scale that typically ranges from two to seven per cent. 
The Ontario government requires drivers to have car insurance. Fortunately insurance companies in Ontario give more than just auto insurance coverage; they offer flexible car insurance options to provide you with specific protection rates matching your income. Different car insurance companies offer different auto insurance rates, some rates being more economical than others. Before seeking these Ontario auto insurance companies out, you must know the basic car insurance laws in Ontario.
Usage-based insurance (UBI) is another new technology that is also becoming more popular where you pay your insurance based on when and how you drive. You install the necessary tracking device on your car and it, along with a GPS, monitors your driving behaviour. The data is examined when your policy is up for renewal, and usually looks at the following:
But a new type of insurance policy has arrived in Canada that may be just the ticket to help out the high risk driver. Usage based insurance (UBI) has been adopted by several insurance companies in Ontario that are now placing data collection boxes–run by telematics technology–in the cars of their customers to track and record how they drive, including monitoring such things as quick turns, hard acceleration, braking and overall speed. Several Ontario auto insurance firms now present customers with a five to 10 percent discount to do a trial run. In the course of trying to establish a better driving record, having such objective data in the hands of auto insurance providers is bound to help the high risk driver who conforms to safe driving habits.
What you use your vehicle for and how often you’re behind the wheel can be a contributing factor in setting car insurance premiums. To get the best rates possible, always try to be as specific as you can about your driving habits. You might consider installing a Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) unit on your car, which tracks where and how you drive, to provide proof of your driving habits. These devices often reward good driving behavior (and penalize bad driving habits such as speeding).

Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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