The immediate impounding of an apparently uninsured vehicle replaces the former method of dealing with insurance spot-checks where drivers were issued with an HORT/1 (so-called because the order was form number 1 issued by the Home Office Road Traffic dept). This 'ticket' was an order requiring that within seven days, from midnight of the date of issue, the driver concerned was to take a valid insurance certificate (and usually other driving documents as well) to a police station of the driver's choice. Failure to produce an insurance certificate was, and still is, an offence. The HORT/1 was commonly known – even by the issuing authorities when dealing with the public – as a "Producer". As these are seldom issued now and the MID relied upon to indicate the presence of insurance or not, it is incumbent upon the insurance industry to accurately and swiftly update the MID with current policy details and insurers that fail to do so can be penalised by their regulating body.
Having a third-party insurance plan is compulsory for all automobiles plying on the Indian roads. This insurance plan provides the coverage arising out of for injuries or damages caused to other people. The beneficiary is third-party only. The prudent way to get coverage for the losses or damages caused to the insured vehicle is buying a comprehensive insurance plan. It provides the coverage for third-party liability along with own damage caused to the insured automobile.
The regulations for vehicle insurance differ with each of the 50 US states and other territories, with each U.S. state having its own mandatory minimum coverage requirements (see separate main article). Each of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia requires drivers to have insurance coverage for both bodily injury and property damage, but the minimum amount of coverage required by law varies by state. For example, minimum bodily injury liability coverage requirements range from $30,000 in Arizona[36] to $100,000 in Alaska and Maine,[37] while minimum property damage liability requirements range from $5,000 to $25,000 in most states.
As a practical matter, resetting odometers requires equipment plus expertise that makes stealing insurance risky and uneconomical. For example, to steal 20,000 miles [32,200 km] of continuous protection while paying for only the 2000 in the 35000 to 37000 range on the odometer, the resetting would have to be done at least nine times, to keep the odometer reading within the narrow 2,000-mile [3,200 km] covered range. There are also powerful legal deterrents to this way of stealing insurance protection. Odometers have always served as the measuring device for resale value, rental and leasing charges, warranty limits, mechanical breakdown insurance, and cents-per-mile tax deductions or reimbursements for business or government travel. Odometer tampering, detected during claim processing, voids the insurance and, under decades-old state and federal law, is punishable by heavy fines and jail.

Cheapest Auto Insurance can access the policy offerings from over 30 of the top auto insurance companies in America. We’ll therefore be able to help you pinpoint the correct coverage options for your own needs. In addition to standard auto coverage, we offer non-owners, motorcycle, boat insurance, SR-22 options, high-risk coverage and more. Regardless of your driving history, we will get you coverage.
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In 1998, the Progressive Insurance company started a pilot program in Texas, in which drivers received a discount for installing a GPS-based device that tracked their driving behavior and reported the results via cellular phone to the company.[49] The program was discontinued in 2000. In following years many policies (including Progressive) have been trialed and successfully introduced worldwide into what are referred to as Telematic Insurance. Such 'telematic' policies typically are based on black-box insurance technology, such devices derive from a stolen vehicle and fleet tracking but are used for insurance purposes. Since 2010 GPS-based and Telematic Insurance systems have become more mainstream in the auto insurance market not just aimed at specialised auto-fleet markets or high value vehicles (with an emphasis on stolen vehicle recovery). Modern GPS-based systems are branded as 'PAYD' Pay As You Drive insurance policies, 'PHYD' Pay How You Drive or since 2012 Smartphone auto insurance policies which utilise smartphones as a GPS sensor, e.g. .[50] A detailed survey of the smartphone as measurement probe for insurance telematics is provided in [51]
Generally, a motor insurance policy is valid for one year and it has to be renewed prior the due date in order to avoid any lapse in the policy. For a smoother insurance experience always pay the insurance premium before the due date. If your policy has lapsed then the automobile would undergo an inspection. In addition to that, if a comprehensive insurance policy remains lapse for a time period of more than the benefit of “No Claim Bonus” isn’t provided.

Soon after the introduction of the Road Traffic Act in 1930, unexpected issues arose when motorists needed to drive a vehicle other than their own in genuine emergency circumstances. Volunteering to move a vehicle, for example, where another motorist had been taken ill or been involved in an accident, could lead to the "assisting" driver being prosecuted for no insurance if the other car's insurance did not cover use by any driver. To alleviate this loophole, an extension to UK Car Insurances was introduced allowing a Policyholder to personally drive any other motor car not belonging to him/her and not hired to him/her under a hire purchase or leasing agreement. This extension of cover, known as "Driving Other Cars" (where it is granted) usually applies to the Policyholder only. The cover provided is for Third Party Risks only and there is absolutely no cover for loss of, or damage to the vehicle being driven. This aspect of UK motor insurance is the only one that purports to cover the driving of a vehicle, not use.
We all know that bulk buying in day to day purchases can save us money, but did you know it can also save you money on your car insurance? This is because many insurance providers offer discounts to steer customers away from competitors. The good news is that with a multi car or dual car insurance policy you can get all the benefits of separate policies such as separate no claims discounts and excesses.
For instance, if your automobile is registered in Chennai, the applicable charges for Zone A would be charged. Even if you shift to another town or city, the same charges would be applied. Likewise, if an automobile is registered in a town, Zone B premium charges are applicable. Later on, in case the vehicle own moves to a metro city, he would be charged the rate of the Zone B only

But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.
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