A couple of at-fault collisions, a few traffic violations or an impaired driving conviction is all it takes to get a high risk driver designation from an auto insurance company in Ontario. That sets you up for high auto insurance premiums for several years or perhaps worse, an outright cancellation or non-renewal of your existing Ontario auto insurance policy.

Because you indicated you occasionally have non-family members as passengers in your car, we recommend Additional Third Party Liability for you. The more passengers you have in your car, the more damages you can be liable for in the event of an accident – not only are non-family members not covered by most standard insurance, they are also more likely to file law suits.
Parts of your auto insurance policy may have deductibles. A deductible is the portion of an insurance claim you agree to pay. Your car insurance provider covers the remaining cost. Your deductibles play a part in how your rates are calculated. Depending on how much financial responsibility you take on in the event of a claim, your auto insurance rates will reflect your commitment. Take on more responsibility (i.e. increase your deductibles) and your rates will lower, take on less responsibility (i.e. decrease your deductibles) and your auto insurance premiums will increase.
In order to operate a vehicle in Canada, you are required to have a valid car insurance policy in place at all times. Car insurance policy requirements vary from province to province, depending on the type of insurance system each is mandated by (public vs. private). However, you need to have a minimum amount of third-party liability insurance, to protect yourself financially in the event that you injure someone or damage their car/property. You’ll also need a minimum amount of accident benefits protection, which provides you with coverage for any medical/rehabilitation costs that occur as result from an accident.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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