Insurance policies have different levels and amounts in terms of coverage. While minimums in Ontario, like $200,000 in third-party liability, are legally required, higher coverage can help cover supplementary costs in the event of an accident resulting in injuries or a lawsuit. Compulsory car insurance also covers fixing your car in the event of a not-at-fault accident – regardless of who’s behind the wheel.
No consideration of your driving experience: Some insurers will accept the fact that you can buy car insurance (with a newly received Canadian driving licence) but will treat you like somebody who has just got a driving licence and has no driving experience. If you are a young driver in Ontario, your rates can reach $250-$350 per month – not a very attractive scenario!

One of the ways you can find out the cost of auto insurance in Toronto is to use a car insurance calculator. Online car insurance calculators make it easy for you to fill out your information so you can assess your coverage and cost options. You'll get a sense of the average Toronto car insurance rates you can expect to pay, based on the information you provided. They are definitely a great resource when shopping for car insurance.
The information and examples provided are intended as general information. This information does not constitute legal or insurance advice. You must speak to one of our insurance advisors before purchasing your policy to review additional coverage options and benefits that could be available. Insurance policies contain exclusions and limitations that may affect your coverage and the benefits payable.
In Alberta, Ontario, the Atlantic provinces, and the territories, there are only private insurers. In British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, basic auto insurance is available from the government and additional coverage is available from private insurers. Quebec, on the other hand, has is it's own unique regulations - public insurance covers injury or death while private insurance covers property damage.
If your driving licence originates from a country that has an agreement with Canada and can be converted into a Canadian licence, there is also the question of how long you can drive with your out-of-country driving licence before you have to convert it, and these times vary by province. Here are examples from Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia:

Insurers determine your rates based on the year, make, model, engine size, and age of a vehicle. More expensive cars, less safe cars, and commonly stolen cars can cost more, as insurance is based partly on how likely your car is to get stolen, how much it would cost to replace it, and the cost to repair it after a crash. Vehicles with the highest safety ratings have lower insurance rates.
If your driving licence originates from a country that has an agreement with Canada and can be converted into a Canadian licence, there is also the question of how long you can drive with your out-of-country driving licence before you have to convert it, and these times vary by province. Here are examples from Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia:

To begin with, you (and all drivers you wish to include in the policy) must have a valid driver's license and be a resident of Canada. Next, insurance companies will look at your prior driving record to determine eligibility and rates. However, rates will vary depending on whether you are looking for a new insurance policy altogether or if you wish to renew an existing one. Other eligibility restrictions may arise from past convictions. This too, will vary depending on when your last conviction occurred and the nature of the conviction.
×