Review your deductibles: If you have collision and comprehensive coverages included in your auto insurance policy, see how much your deductibles are. If they are set at $500, increasing them to $1,000 will typically save you about five to 10 per cent. Only increase them however, if your budget allows for it because the deductible is what you’ll have to fork out should you need to submit a claim.

While vacationing in California, you have a serious accident for which you are held responsible, leaving the other driver seriously injured. The other driver decides to sue, which results in a judgment against you for the damages to the other driver's vehicle, medical expenses and loss of revenue. The settlement is expensive, but your Additional Third Party Liability helps to cover it.
However, there are some other federal and provincial laws that allow for exceptions. The biggest exception is Bill S-4, or the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. One of the implications for insurance companies is that it they can share personal information without consent if it reasonably allows them to discover and prevent fraud.
You can save a bit of money by paying for your insurance once per year rather than once per month. This helps the insurance company save on the administrative costs of billing you every month and a lot of the time they will pass the cost savings on to you. It means you will have to pay a larger amount all at once, but in the long run it can help you save as long as you have that money up front.
Comprehensive: With this option, you’re covered for any threat or danger other than collision, including theft*, damage or loss caused by vandalism, projectiles, and falling or flying objects such as stones kicked up by a truck in front of you. The important thing to remember is that this coverage applies to your vehicle only, not you or your passengers.
In Alberta, Ontario, the Atlantic provinces, and the territories, there are only private insurers. In British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, basic auto insurance is available from the government and additional coverage is available from private insurers. Quebec, on the other hand, has is it's own unique regulations - public insurance covers injury or death while private insurance covers property damage.
To begin with, you (and all drivers you wish to include in the policy) must have a valid driver's license and be a resident of Canada. Next, insurance companies will look at your prior driving record to determine eligibility and rates. However, rates will vary depending on whether you are looking for a new insurance policy altogether or if you wish to renew an existing one. Other eligibility restrictions may arise from past convictions. This too, will vary depending on when your last conviction occurred and the nature of the conviction.
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