In order to operate a vehicle in Canada, you are required to have a valid car insurance policy in place at all times. Car insurance policy requirements vary from province to province, depending on the type of insurance system each is mandated by (public vs. private). However, you need to have a minimum amount of third-party liability insurance, to protect yourself financially in the event that you injure someone or damage their car/property. You’ll also need a minimum amount of accident benefits protection, which provides you with coverage for any medical/rehabilitation costs that occur as result from an accident.
To follow that excellent advice, we’ll continue with another common tip: increase your deductible. It’s not uncommon for those who increase their deductible from $350 to $500 to save 10 to 20 percent on their annual car insurance cost, and possibly a lot more if you bump up the deductible to $1,000. As you discuss this with your car insurance broker or representative in Toronto, why not ask about how combining policies, or bundling insurance packages, can save you money. It’s quite reasonable to expect a 15 percent discount by having one company providing both your home and car insurance requirements. Also, if you have the means, paying your annual premium in one lump sum is another method to lower insurance costs.
Do you have a teenager with a new license? While this is an exciting time, the idea of your child driving your car around Toronto can be nerve wracking. But with PC auto insurance, you can get the coverage for your child for their driving adventures in the city. Here are some points to consider when adding them to your existing car insurance policy:
No consideration of your driving experience: Some insurers will accept the fact that you can buy car insurance (with a newly received Canadian driving licence) but will treat you like somebody who has just got a driving licence and has no driving experience. If you are a young driver in Ontario, your rates can reach $250-$350 per month – not a very attractive scenario!

Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.
ERS insurance provides you with roadside assistance in the event of a breakdown or mishap while you're out driving. It also covers the cost of getting your car back on the road. Those costs may include light mechanical labour, an oil or gas delivery, new batteries, a boost, tire changes, locksmith services, or even a tow. With help on the way, ERS takes the stress out of a breakdown.

Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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