What you use your vehicle for and how often you’re behind the wheel can be a contributing factor in setting car insurance premiums. To get the best rates possible, always try to be as specific as you can about your driving habits. You might consider installing a Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) unit on your car, which tracks where and how you drive, to provide proof of your driving habits. These devices often reward good driving behavior (and penalize bad driving habits such as speeding).
*60% of Kanetix customers in Ontario who participated in the survey said Kanetix helped them identify an average savings amount of $776.58 (December 1, 2015 - February 29, 2016) on their car insurance. The cited amount represents the average difference between the best quote obtained at www.kanetix.ca and the current premium amount of participants in the survey. The savings amount varies by individual and does not constitute a guarantee; in each individual case, the difference may be smaller or greater than the savings amount cited.
Many universities and colleges have partnerships with a major insurance company to provide cheaper car insurance to current students as well as alumni. They will usually offer other discounts if you bundle with home insurance, as well as priority customer service if you are contacting them for information or to make a claim. Call your school’s representative to find out what benefits you can get, and as always make sure you still compare their quotes in case you can save more money elsewhere.

A car insurance deductible, in essence, is a predetermined amount of money required to be paid by the policyholder when a claim is filed. In Ontario, deductibles can vary, with standard base amounts at about $500 for collision coverage and $300 for comprehensive coverage. A higher deductible can mean lower car insurance premiums but means more money comes out of your pocket during a claim.
In Alberta, Ontario, the Atlantic provinces, and the territories, there are only private insurers. In British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, basic auto insurance is available from the government and additional coverage is available from private insurers. Quebec, on the other hand, has is it's own unique regulations - public insurance covers injury or death while private insurance covers property damage.

If you live in Quebec, the provincial public automobile insurance plan covers you for injury or death due to an automobile accident, no matter who is at fault or where in the world the accident happened. However, under the Automobile Insurance Act, you also have to have third-party liability insurance of at least $50,000 for property damage. This protection, available from private insurers such as The Co-operators, covers any property damage caused to another party.
A couple of at-fault collisions, a few traffic violations or an impaired driving conviction is all it takes to get a high risk driver designation from an auto insurance company in Ontario. That sets you up for high auto insurance premiums for several years or perhaps worse, an outright cancellation or non-renewal of your existing Ontario auto insurance policy.

Here's what happens in case of a covered accident: First, you report a claim — online, or through your agent. If there's damage to your vehicle, you can choose your own repair shop or one of our preferred auto shops, which provide great repairs and guaranteed completion dates. Then, subject to the terms and conditions of your auto insurance policy, we pay for the damages. Our claim specialists help find repair facilities in your area, keep you updated on work being done, and process your claim quickly and efficiently.
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