Claims on multi car policies are usually dealt with similarly to single car policies. All multi car policies are different so it’s important to check with your insurer, but the best multi car insurance policies will not penalise one driver if another makes a claim. If someone else on the policy makes a claim, for example if your partner makes a claim on their car, your no claims bonus will not be affected.
You’ll notice that none of that liability coverage pays for your car or injuries, nor for any injuries your passengers sustain if you cause a wreck. This is why many people — particularly those whose car isn’t yet paid off — want “full coverage” car insurance. This isn’t actually a type of coverage, but instead typically refers to policies that include liability coverage, plus comprehensive and collision coverages.
We wrote the book on low price car insurance, but the story isn’t just about discounts. We’ll go a step further by giving you the power to tailor the quote to your budget and protection needs. We’ll also make sure you’ve maximized your savings opportunities with helpful hints below. That’s why you’re at the best place to buy cheap auto insurance online.

There are three states that do not have a private CTP scheme. In Victoria, the Transport Accident Commission provides CTP through a levy in the vehicle registration fee, known as the TAC charge.[7] A similar scheme exists in Tasmania through the Motor Accidents Insurance Board.[8] A similar scheme applies in Western Australia, through the Insurance Commission of Western Australia (ICWA).[9]
Multi car insurance is designed for households with more than one car, and you can usually cover up to a maximum of five cars on one policy. You can think of it as a family car insurance policy, where each additional vehicle on the policy earns a further multi car discount from the insurer. While some insurers will only cover cars registered to the same address, the best multi car insurance policies will also allow you to cover cars driven by your immediate family, even if they live elsewhere.

A compulsory car insurance scheme was first introduced in the United Kingdom with the Road Traffic Act 1930. This ensured that all vehicle owners and drivers had to be insured for their liability for injury or death to third parties whilst their vehicle was being used on a public road.[1] Germany enacted similar legislation in 1939 called the "Act on the Implementation of Compulsory Insurance for Motor Vehicle Owners."[2]
You’ll notice that none of that liability coverage pays for your car or injuries, nor for any injuries your passengers sustain if you cause a wreck. This is why many people — particularly those whose car isn’t yet paid off — want “full coverage” car insurance. This isn’t actually a type of coverage, but instead typically refers to policies that include liability coverage, plus comprehensive and collision coverages.
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