Many universities and colleges have partnerships with a major insurance company to provide cheaper car insurance to current students as well as alumni. They will usually offer other discounts if you bundle with home insurance, as well as priority customer service if you are contacting them for information or to make a claim. Call your school’s representative to find out what benefits you can get, and as always make sure you still compare their quotes in case you can save more money elsewhere.

What the above facts help illustrate is that, quite simply, Toronto is a big, busy city with lots of cars on the road. This translates to lots of driving and lots of traffic congestion, which can lead to accidents - especially multi-vehicle accidents. Factor in pedestrians, cyclists, and public transportation (TTC), and there is no shortage of things that drivers need to pay attention to when behind the wheel.


If you’re committed to switching car insurance providers in order to save a significant sum on your car insurance, it’s worthwhile to find a car insurance firm in Toronto that provides usage-based insurance. UBI employs a telematics-based device that’s placed in your car to monitor your driving behaviour including braking, acceleration, and frequency of turns. You can save five to 10 percent on your annual car insurance cost just by trying it out and up to 30 percent if the driving data collected by the black box supports the fact that you’re one of the drivers that belongs on the road – not one of the irresponsible ones whose licence isn’t worth the plastic it’s printed on!
Insurance rates are always changing. Take car insurance, for example. In many provinces, rates change every three months. Car insurance companies typically apply to their respective regulating board to have their rates either increased or decreased. This means that even if you were getting the best rate two years ago, you might not be getting the best rate today. It's just the nature of the car insurance industry, which is why these same regulating boards recommend drivers shop around and compare rates from at least three different car insurance companies before purchasing a policy. 

This is what I did 10 years ago when I was in my late-teens and driving. I had an old beat-up car, but my dad was listed as the primary driver and I as the secondary. When I was the primary, my rates were $200. When I was moved to the secondary, they were cut to about $70. Of course, my dad's went up from $60 to $90, but I gladly paid the difference since I ultimately saved $100 a month. I hope this is still the case, but it's worth looking into. TD can give you quotes. I'm with them and I regularly change my insurance information two or three times a year.


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As the most populated city in Canada, and the 4th most populated city in North America, Toronto is home to a lot of drivers — and a lot of vehicles. All those cars on the road can make driving in Toronto seem a bit daunting. After all, this is the land of bumper-to-bumper commutes, 16-lane highways, and people who want to get where they're going in a hurry.
To drive in Canada, auto insurance is required by law from coast-to-coast-to-coast; however, the cost for coverage varies significantly depending on which province or territory you live in. A recent report (2017) commissioned by Ontario’s Ministry of Finance detailed the average auto insurance premiums paid by drivers across the country, and the range in rates is considerable.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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