Rental car insurance and credit cards: Many Canadian credit cards include rental car insurance coverage, but there is something very important to know about this. It DOES NOT cover 3rd party liability, meaning that if you damage somebody’s else property, it is not covered. This type of insurance is called a damage/collision wavier, and, as opposed to a real car insurance policy, it is only good for covering scratches/damages on the rental car itself.

Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.


Insurance policies have different levels and amounts in terms of coverage. While minimums in Ontario, like $200,000 in third-party liability, are legally required, higher coverage can help cover supplementary costs in the event of an accident resulting in injuries or a lawsuit. Compulsory car insurance also covers fixing your car in the event of a not-at-fault accident – regardless of who’s behind the wheel.

To follow that excellent advice, we’ll continue with another common tip: increase your deductible. It’s not uncommon for those who increase their deductible from $350 to $500 to save 10 to 20 percent on their annual car insurance cost, and possibly a lot more if you bump up the deductible to $1,000. As you discuss this with your car insurance broker or representative in Toronto, why not ask about how combining policies, or bundling insurance packages, can save you money. It’s quite reasonable to expect a 15 percent discount by having one company providing both your home and car insurance requirements. Also, if you have the means, paying your annual premium in one lump sum is another method to lower insurance costs.
This insurance is required by law throughout Canada. It covers the costs associated with damages caused to another person or vehicle in an accident, including medical bills, rehabilitation, lost earnings, legal fees, and other expenses up to the limit of your policy. As a practical matter, you'll want enough insurance to cover a judgment against you in a major accident so that your personal assets won't be put at risk.
We merged with Alex Berthelot Insurance Brokers in January 2013. With this acquisition we were pleased to obtain Alison Rogers who is a graduate of Sault College. She has been a licensed insurance broker for11 years and works in both personal and commercial lines insurance. In her spare time she is an active hockey mom and enjoys watching both her sons play hockey.
If you’re driving an older model car in Toronto and not considering purchasing a newer vehicle for a while, investigate the cost of upgrading to anti-lock brakes, air bags, automatic seat belts, installing anti-theft devices or putting in a burglar alarm. Car insurance companies in Toronto often provide discounts for such products or enhancements. If the cost of doing so is favourable versus the long-term savings in your car insurance rate, it’s worth the investment. For older vehicles, it’s also worth considering dropping your Collision coverage to reduce your premiums.

Review your deductibles: If you have collision and comprehensive coverages included in your auto insurance policy, see how much your deductibles are. If they are set at $500, increasing them to $1,000 will typically save you about five to 10 per cent. Only increase them however, if your budget allows for it because the deductible is what you’ll have to fork out should you need to submit a claim.
In Alberta, Ontario, the Atlantic provinces, and the territories, there are only private insurers. In British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, basic auto insurance is available from the government and additional coverage is available from private insurers. Quebec, on the other hand, has is it's own unique regulations - public insurance covers injury or death while private insurance covers property damage.
Preferred Vendor Program: Preferred Vendors offer the highest-quality workmanship. When you choose a Preferred Vendor for your repairs, the quality of workmanship is monitored and the bill is settled directly with the repair shop, giving you a hassle-free claims experience. Plus, collision repairs made by a Preferred Vendor are guaranteed for life.1
Once you get your car insurance quotes, call Kanetix.ca and we'll help you secure your rate. We'll connect you to the provider who offered you the best rate with our priority phone lines. With your permission, we'll also send your quote details to the insurance provider you've selected so you don't have to enter the same information twice. Then, once you are speaking with them, they will validate the information to ensure it is accurate and up-to-date, and your insurance needs are met.
*60% of Kanetix customers in Ontario who participated in the survey said Kanetix helped them identify an average savings amount of $776.58 (December 1, 2015 - February 29, 2016) on their car insurance. The cited amount represents the average difference between the best quote obtained at www.kanetix.ca and the current premium amount of participants in the survey. The savings amount varies by individual and does not constitute a guarantee; in each individual case, the difference may be smaller or greater than the savings amount cited.
Insurance policies have different levels and amounts in terms of coverage. While minimums in Ontario, like $200,000 in third-party liability, are legally required, higher coverage can help cover supplementary costs in the event of an accident resulting in injuries or a lawsuit. Compulsory car insurance also covers fixing your car in the event of a not-at-fault accident – regardless of who’s behind the wheel.

Insurance rates are always changing. Take car insurance, for example. In many provinces, rates change every three months. Car insurance companies typically apply to their respective regulating board to have their rates either increased or decreased. This means that even if you were getting the best rate two years ago, you might not be getting the best rate today. It's just the nature of the car insurance industry, which is why these same regulating boards recommend drivers shop around and compare rates from at least three different car insurance companies before purchasing a policy. 


Because you travel, we recommend this coverage. Other provinces and countries can have different laws and higher court costs, the risks of which this coverage reduces. Because you have non-family members as passengers, we recommend this coverage. If you are liable in an accident involving people and property not in your family, you’ll have coverage for their damages and your legal fees. Because you travel and have non-family members as passengers, we recommend this coverage. If you are liable in an accident involving people and property not in your family, you’ll have coverage for their damages and your legal fees which is especially important when travelling to places with different laws and court costs.


Usage-based insurance (UBI) is another new technology that is also becoming more popular where you pay your insurance based on when and how you drive. You install the necessary tracking device on your car and it, along with a GPS, monitors your driving behaviour. The data is examined when your policy is up for renewal, and usually looks at the following:
In Ontario, the minimum amount of third-party liability coverage, which covers you in a situation where you damage someone else’s property with your car, is $200,000. Although this amount may seem high, it is recommended to take out a plan that offers more protection to help cover you and your family in the event of a more serious accident where people may get injured. If you are in a province which requires a higher minimum, an Ontario car insurance policy must cover the new amount.
Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD): Available only in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, P.E.I. and Quebec, this covers the cost of loss or damage to your car in an accident for which you were not entirely responsible. To qualify, the other driver has to be identified, insured and found to be at least partially at fault. In some provinces, you can no longer sue another person for damage to your car.
Each quarter, insurers can apply to have their rates increased or decreased. The Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO), which oversees insurance regulation in the province, approves or denies these requests. Most of the time, insurers request rate increases due to changes in a particular coverage. For example, an insurer experiencing an increased prevalence in payouts resulting from car accidents might apply to have rates increased to help offset the costs of increased claims.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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