Those that will continue your driving record: Some companies will consider your previous experience and will offer you a rate based on how long you have been driving, no matter where you got your on-road experience. Check with a broker to see which companies consider previous out-of-Canada experience so you can reduce your chances of a denial and increase your chances of getting the best possible rate.
The secret to finding cheap car insurance in these provinces is to compare auto insurance rates from as many insurers as possible. Some websites compare rates from just a few providers, but claim they will save you thousands of dollars. We are transparent about the insurers we work. We search for the cheapest car insurance rates across 25 insurance companies – see above (varies by province). This is, by far, more than the most other websites out there. Give it a try and start saving today.
Review your deductibles: If you have collision and comprehensive coverages included in your auto insurance policy, see how much your deductibles are. If they are set at $500, increasing them to $1,000 will typically save you about five to 10 per cent. Only increase them however, if your budget allows for it because the deductible is what you’ll have to fork out should you need to submit a claim.
For example, if there's a ticket you forgot to include, or you decide to go with a different deductible, then your auto insurance rate will likely change. The same is true too, if you choose not to bundle your home insurance but originally indicated it was something you'd consider doing. If you don't end up getting home insurance with the provider you buy your auto insurance from, then you'll lose the multi-line discount that was originally applied to your auto insurance quote.
Keep in mind that the minimum car insurance coverage required is determined by the Government of Ontario and may vary in comparison to Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. In addition, premiums can vary depending on the area in which you reside, typically being higher in major urban centres, such as Toronto.
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